2017 Conference

PharmedOut is happy to announce our next conference! This page will be updated frequently with information about themes, speakers, abstracts, and agendas.

Details:

June 15-16, 2017

Georgetown University, Washington, DC.

Conference Schedule

Day 1: June 15

How industry influences trade discourse and why it matters
Ruth Lopert MD, MMedSC, the George Washington University Milken School of Public Health

Myths and realities about why US drugs cost so much
Joel Lexchin MD, York University

The Overuse of Orthopedic Procedures: From the Questionable to the Inappropriate and Unnecessary
James Rickert MD, Indiana University School of Medicine, Society for Patient-Centered Orthopedics

Salespeople in the surgical suite: surgeons' relationships with medical device  reps 
Bonnie O’Connor PhD, Brown University

Can’t You Hear that Lonesome Whistle Blow? Why Medical Researchers Stay Silent about Wrongdoing
Carl Elliott MD PhD, University of Minnesota

The Canary in the Coal Mine: How the Prescription Drug Epidemic is a Symptom of a Faltering Health Care System
Anna Lembke MD, Stanford University

Day 2: June 16

ADHD: The Making of an American Epidemic
Alan Schwarz, author 

Why routine screening for depression may be bad for your health
Lisa Cosgrove PhD

Relationships between Consumer Advocacy Groups and Pharmaceutical Companies
Susan Wood PhD, Associate Professor, the George Washington University Milken School of Public Health (and former director, FDA Office of Women’s Health); Sharon Batt PhD, author of Advocacy, Inc.; Cindy Pearson, Executive Director of National Women’s Health Network;  and Barbara Mintzes PhD, University of Sydney

Off-label promotion of drugs and devices
Josh Sharfstein MD, Associate Dean, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (and former deputy director, FDA) and Coleen Klasmeier JD, Partner, Sidley Austin LLP

When Retractions Become Weapons(And Why They're Not Always The Best Way To Clean Up The Literature)
Ivan Oransky MD, Retraction Watch

Are journalists not setting the example for conflict-of-interest discussions?

Gary Schwitzer, Health News Review